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moskafleur:

eteo:

dweebscar:

inwhichifeelallthefeels:

cyanide123:

dweebscar:

dweebscar:

what if giraffes lived underwater

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what a majestic creature

It would explain nessie

Oh my God. I have been waiting literally over a year to use this gif, and before I do, I want to thank you for the opportunity.

pardon

yOU FUFCKGN ASSHOEL I JUTS SPIT MY LATTE ON MY TABLET F UCK TOUOYU JESUS CHRIST

Best post I’ve seen this month

(via geothebio)

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Yes, well, it’s quite an extraordinary position to be in to sort of say, “Hello, I’m Peter, and I’m playing this iconic historically much-loved character that’s been around for 50 years.” - Peter Capaldi [x]

(Source: rosecutietyler, via virginiachance)

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not-love-not-always:

" The man who abhors violence, never carrying a gun, but this is the truth, Doctor. You take ordinary people and you fashion them into weapons… behold your Children of Time." - Davros

(via virginiachance)

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dearborns:

foxnewsofficial:

they should replace hospital gowns with colourful mexican ponchos because they’re kinda similar and no one could be sad 

if we’re gonna die let’s die looking like a peruvian folk band

(via kenyanplanes)

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Peter’s first meeting with the TARDIS (i suppose)
[x]

(Source: dadskills, via dearguildenstern)

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"You always start from the same point: The Doctor is the Doctor. I’ve never actually written a script where I didn’t know who the Doctor was going to be. You just start thinking about the actor’s voice, speech patterns, mannerisms, and the whole attitude. The main thing with Peter is the obvious factor that he’s a lot older than Matt. I knew he wanted to be a lot more skeptical and less accessible while still being lots of fun. And immediately, you start to think of early Tom Baker in that way. One of the things I remember being thrilled about as a child watching the show — Jon Pertwee was my Doctor, and I was devastated when he left — but I remember the thrill of the newness of Tom. There’s a bit in “The Seeds of Doom” when they’re discussing amputating someone’s arm because it’s been infected by the Krynoid. Tom sits there with his hat on like Clint Eastwood and just says, “You must help yourselves.” And it sent goose-bumps down my spine because it’s like, “What? The Doctor’s not like that!” But suddenly he was. And suddenly, in this episode, you’ve got a Doctor who’s quite grumpy with Robin Hood. Matt would probably have gone out for a drink with him! Just the fact that you can suddenly have a change of attitude like that makes the whole thing new and fresh again."

Mark Gatiss on Writing Doctor Who, Robin Hood — Vulture (via doctorwho)

(via doctorwho)

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pixalry:

Harry Potter Travel Posters - Created by The Green Dragon Inn

Prints are available for sale on Etsy. Check more of their travel designs here.

(via cerseilennisters)

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fyeahcatherinetate:

donna noble + tumblr text posts (part 2)

(via virginiachance)

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edwardspoonhands:

pyrrhiccomedy:

edens-blog:

heartbeatofatimelord:

physcoaustin:

tardisol:

IF YOU HAD ROOM WITH ABSOLUTELY NOTHING IN IT AND THE WALLS CEILING AND FLOOR WERE MADE OF MIRROR WHAT WOULD IT LOOK LIKE IN THE MIRRORS

No.

Holy shit I asked my dad who’s a physics teacher and he just looked at me, looked at the table, looked at me, tried not to smile, looked angry, and started to look up where you can buy big mirrors.

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this is an actual room of mirrors.

as you can see, it leads to glitches in the matrix

Pshh. This is some entry-level nerd shit. Stand back.

It would be dark, obviously. If there’s nothing in the room, I assume there’s also no light source in the room. Mirrors reflect light. No light, and it’s just a room with glass walls.

"Fine, smarty-pants, then there’s a light source."

Okay, then the mirrors would infinitely reflect the lamp, or whatever.

"Ugh, then there’s just a magic floating ball of light in the middle of the room. No lamp."

That’s just a lamp with no sharp edges, if you think about it.

"UGH. Just imagine that the room is UNIFORMLY LIT, but not FROM anything. Or a laser beam just, like, HAPPENED."

Okay, well if we’re suspending the laws of physics now in this hypothetical scenario, we have to clarify a few points:

- Do the mirrors join each other perfectly at the corners, floor, and ceiling; i.e., with no cracks?

In the real world this would be next to impossible; the gap between each mirror would need to be significantly smaller than one wavelength of light. If not, what you’d predominantly see reflected would be those cracks. That’s one of the things that’s happening in the picture above. For this reason, this hypothetical is usually posed as a perfectly-smooth mirrored sphere, to avoid needing to talk about cracks and corners.

- Are these perfect mirrors?

That is, do they reflect 100% of all light on all wavelengths? Because perfect mirrors kind of don’t really exist. Did you know that your bathroom mirror only reflects about 25% of the light energy that strikes it back at you? The mirrors used in laser laboratories can get up to 80 or 90%, and I read about a mirror developed at MIT recently which apparently reflects more than 98% of light energy. The light energy which doesn’t bounce off the mirror is absorbed by it instead: at which point it becomes heat. Even if you had a mirror so good that only 0.0000001% of its light energy was converted into heat energy on every bounce, your light would still dissipate almost instantly, because of how fast light travels (and, therefore, how many bounces it makes per second).

- Is there air in the room?

Yeah—you know how I said that light energy becomes heat energy when it bounces off of an imperfect mirror (or, if you prefer, ‘literally anything’)? Well, passing through all those atoms and molecules it encounters in the air takes the same kind of toll. If you don’t want your light to be reduced to heat-mush before you can finish blinking your eyes, you’d need your room to be a perfect vacuum. And perfect vacuums? Yeah, those don’t exist either.

UGHHHHHH. YES, okay, the room is PERFECTLY spherical, it’s coated in a PERFECT mirror, and it contains a PERFECT vacuum. Just tell me what it looks like, oh my God!”

Well…it doesn’t look like anything.

I mean…’looking’ implies the existence of an observer, right? You have constructed a hypothetical chamber which could not admit an observer of any kind. As soon as you cut a hole in the room to take a peak inside, all of the light would escape/be converted into a heat, and you’d be left with total darkness again. Even if you could construct a room like the one you’re describing, there’d be no way to know what was happening inside it!

I WILL EAT YOU.

—BUT: hypothetically, it wouldn’t be dark in there before you messed it up.

It would be white.

A perfectly featureless, perfectly regular, perfectly boring white room.

What did you expect? Light, visible light anyway, is white. You see colors when photons are absorbed by the atoms of a substrate, but we’ve already determined that these are perfect mirrors, so no photons are being absorbed. In your perfect mirror room, there is nothing to see: just light, bouncing around into infinity, doing nothing whatsoever of any interest.

Aria Heller, Everyone.

(Source: teenytomlin)